Specsavers Sauchiehall gave away trial frames to GCU students

Optometry students looking ahead with trial frame donation

Opticians donate £3,600 worth of kit to GCU student trip to South Africa

Specsavers opticians in Scotland have donated 20 pairs of trial frames, each worth £180, to the Optometry Society within Glasgow Caledonian University.

The equipment will be used during students’ yearly trip volunteering in South Africa, within the eye clinic on the Phelophepa Train of Hope.

The Phelophepa Train of Hope operates two unique trains which serve as mobile healthcare hospitals, bringing much needed medical services to impoverished rural areas within South Africa.

50 third year students from the GCU society will be spending two weeks on board the train within the eyecare clinic where they will be carrying out full eye tests and screening for eye diseases.

optometry students in trial frames at Specsavers Sauchiehall Street Glasgow

Sarah Freel, Specsavers regional chair representative, says: ‘The work that Phelophepa Train of Hope carries out by providing those in need with critical healthcare services is truly remarkable.

‘We donated 10 pairs of trial frames to the GCU students last year to support their trip and help with their tests. However, the students mentioned they didn’t have enough to go around and that some were broken. Therefore we were happy to donate double the number of frames this year to help them further, as it is an essential piece of equipment for carrying out an eye test.’

Harris Hamilton, president of the GCU Optics Society, says: ‘I would like to thank Specsavers yet again for their incredibly generous donation to equip the students on their upcoming trip to South Africa. Having more trial frames means the volunteers are able to get through and help more patients than before, throughout the day.

‘Having volunteered on the train myself, I have seen first-hand the difference the services provided make to the people’s lives who visit the train. I dealt with some people who travelled 100km just to get an appointment on board, some people who had never had glasses before and others who had a serious eye disease. It is so rewarding being able to help those in need with a service we take for granted back home.’

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